DIY Gardening Ideas: Beautify A Flower Garden Using Kinds Of Orange Color Flowers To Warm The Summer

There are many benefits for having flower garden in our house. No matter on the size of the flower garden, It could be a mini flower garden or a big flower garden. Planting kinds of plants and flowers could refresh the air surrounding the house and could boost our mood.

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Orange is well known as a color of happiness and life. This color looks great everywhere and can bring cheer and brightness in your garden.  Bring the family of orange flowers and make your garden glow along the summer. The following is the list of orange flowers which you can bring in your garden.

8+ Recommended Kinds Of Orange Flowers For Glowing Your Garden Along The Summer

1.Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

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Butterfly Weed is the iconic, bright orange beauty that’s a staple in every butterfly garden. This showy native wildflower is easy to grow, cold hardy, and does well in poor, dry soils. Long-lasting clusters of small, flat-topped flowers are crowned with a yellow, sun-kissed “corona” and bloom from June through August. Butterfly Weed is an important nectar source for Monarch butterflies and its leaves provide essential food for developing Monarch caterpillars – but expect to see a variety of pollinators making use of this plant.

2. Orange Dahlia

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Your dahlias will do the best when planted in your existing garden or yard soil. Even if you think you don’t you have the best soil, this soil will be better for them than bringing in new. For best results, dahlias should be planted from mid April through May for most areas. Ground temperature is approximately 60 degrees. (exceptions will be hot climates). In general about the same time you would plant your vegetable garden. Dahlias need a sunny location to thrive. An area that receives at least 8 hours of direct sunlight is best. Less sun equals taller plants and less blooms. Exception for hot climates, they will need morning sunlight, afternoon shade.

3. Flame Calla Lily (Zantedeschia)

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‘Flame’ Calla Lily has fiery orange, fluted blooms with deep red edges and playful, speckled foliage. Though they’re mostly known as ‘market’ bouquet flowers, callas can be used as unexpected companions in the perennial garden. Try ‘Flame’ tucked in front of other summer favorites, like dark-blooming dahlias and spiky liatris.

4. Primrose

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Primrose perennials should be planted in lightly shaded areas with well-drained soil, preferably amended with organic matter. Set primrose plants about 6 to 12 inches apart and 4 to 6 inches deep. Water the primrose thoroughly after planting. Add a layer of mulch around the plants to help retain moisture. Continue to give your primroses thorough watering throughout the summer months, about once a week or more during periods of drought, but let off once fall approaches.

5. Orange Rose

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Good as cut flowers, they have a strong spicy sweet fragrance. The plant is bushy and needs full sun. Generally grows from 3 to 3.5 feet, spreading habit, has good disease resistance and dark green bronze tinted foliage.

6. Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia)

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This plant is very easy to grow, and will attract lots of butterflies to your garden. Reaching six feet high and up to four feet wide, it’s like an annual hedge! Bright orange daisy flowers cover large velvety leaves. Planting Sunflowers grow best in locations with full sun; they prefer long, hot summers to flower well. Though they’re not too fussy, sunflowers thrive in slightly acidic to somewhat alkaline (pH 6.0 to 7.5). If possible, put seeds in a spot that is sheltered from strong winds, perhaps along a fence or near a building.

7. Lantana

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Wild sage is a scrambling, thorny, evergreen shrub that can grow up to 2 meters tall and perhaps 2.5 meters wide. Some forms of the plant are able to clamber into other plants for support and thus reach greater heights.
The plant is widely used in domestic medicine. It is commonly cultivated as an ornamental in tropical gardens, where it is also grown as a hedge plant

8. Montbretia

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Crocosmias, commonly called montbretia, are corms which form dense clumps of upright sword-shaped foliage. In midsummer this makes a good background for the sprays of bright orange flowers, carried in branched spikes. It’s ideal for growing in swathes through the herbaceous border and the flowers are excellent for cutting. In very cold areas, the plants need a sheltered site and the bulbs should be lifted and stored over winter. Propagate by division in the spring.

9. Orange Dream Japanese Maple

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The Orange Dream Japanese Maple soon becomes a small tree, about 10 feet tall and 5 feet wide. It is the perfect size for a smaller garden, or to grow in a courtyard, or even in a large container. With its natural form it looks perfect in an informal garden, or an Asian-inspired one. Grow it under large deciduous trees, or in sun, and with some shelter from the heat of the afternoon sun. In spring this tree is stunning with leave of orange-yellow, edged in red. In summer it is a cool combination of green and red tips. In fall it explodes into a fire-ball of orange and umber. Constantly changing, this tree is a fascinating feature in any garden, and with its slightly wider lobed leaves it is much less likely to shrivel and burn, as so many Japanese maples with finely-divided foliage do. It is hardy from zone 5 to zone 8, so it can be grown almost anywhere.

Maya Moka